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GD005

Tyne

South Shore

Reed's Shipyard

Gateshead

54.967817, -1.604684

Useful Links:

Opened:

1705

Closed:

Owners:

Thomas Reed

Types built here:

Customers (Not Exhaustive):

Estimated Output:

Construction Materials:

Wood

Status:

Redeveloped

Last Updated:

11/06/23

Description

Contemporary evidence from Ralph Gardner states that ships were built on the south shore of the Tyne in the 17th century, however it is difficult to know exactly where.

In 1705, Thomas Reed leased land for two smith's shops and a wet dock near Rock Staith on the South Shore for shipbuilding. This was likely for keels and small boats for coal shipment from the east. The Rock Staiths belonged to the Liddell's from 1867 and was located exactly where the Tyne Bridge now stands. As a result, we can deduce this shipyard was probably between the Tyne Bridge and the end of South Shore Road to the east.

Much of the shipbuilding activity in this area was concentrated at Hillgate and South Shore.

It later moved eastwards due to the need for deeper waters to facilitate larger ships.

'Sketches of The Coal Mines in Northumberland and Durham' T.H.Hair, published in 1844

Bielby's Plan of Newcastle and Gateshead of 1788. Though the map isn't detailed enough to illustrate the specific shipyards, it at least provides a taster to the area in the 18th century. Source: British Library

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Historic Environment Records

Durham/Northumberland: Keys to the Past

Tyne and Wear: Sitelines

HER information as described above is reproduced under the basis the resource is free of charge for education use. It is not altered unless there are grammatical errors. 

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