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3003

Oxclose Colliery

Oxclose, Washington

54.897927,-1.536657

Opened:

Closed:

pre-1805

19th c

Entry Created:

3 Sept 2021

Last Updated:

17 May 2023

Redeveloped

Condition:

Owners: 

George Elliott & Johasshon (1850s)

Description (or HER record listing)

Oxclose Colliery. This was served by Oxclose Wagonway. Opened before 1805 by George Elliot and Johasshon. Shown on a map of 1807 by D. Akenhead & Sons "The Picture of Newcastle upon Tyne". On 29 November 1805, an explosion killed 38 miners.

NEHL - The Oxclose Colliery was a fairly sizeable working in the standards of the early 19th century. The complex was served by a number of sidings and ancillary buildings, including an engine house at the B Pit which was adjoined by the A Pit. There were at least 7 pit ponds to drain water from the workings, as well as pit rows to provide accommodation for workers. Much of the site was still extant in the 1890s though disused. An inn was still situated at the pit rows as well as the shafts and heaps. This is still the case in the 1910s, though all of the area was redeveloped for the New Town. Part of the cutting for the Oxclose Waggonway still exists, though is severed in parts.

Ordnance Survey, 1862

Ordnance Survey, 1862

The Oxclose Colliery was located at the housing estate just beyond the highway.

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A shot of the waggonway in the early 1960s, well after lifting and just before the New Town development. A ventilation shaft can still be seen. Source: Waggonways of Washington, Facebook

A shot of the waggonway in the early 1960s, well after lifting and just before the New Town development. A ventilation shaft can still be seen. Source: Waggonways of Washington, Facebook

Historic Environment Records

Durham/Northumberland: Keys to the Past

Tyne and Wear: Sitelines

HER information as described above is reproduced under the basis the resource is free of charge for education use. It is not altered unless there are grammatical errors. 

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